Neighborhood Kids Reach Out to Beacon House Seniors

Neighborhood children connected with seniors living at Beacon House by sending them cards through an effort coordinated by the Beacon Hill Civic Association earlier this month.

Patricia Tully, executive director of the Civic Association, got the word out through daily e-blasts and in the organization’s weekly Community Corner column in this publication. All together, kids left around 30 cards outside the Civic Association’s Joy Street office, which sat for several days to decontaminate before they were delivered to Beacon House. The cards were then placed in a common area at Beacon House for all residents and visitors to see and enjoy.

“We are grateful for the work of the Beacon Hill Civic Association for reaching out to our elder residents at Beacon House during this time of social distancing and isolation,” Walter J. Ramos, president and CEO of Roslindale-based Rogerson Communities, which manages Beacon House, among other senior living facilities, said in a statement. “The cards from the neighborhood children have been on display and distributed to the residents and are providing a great morale boost.”

Courtney Barth, a Rogerson Communities spokesperson, added, “It’s a hard time for everyone, and this type of community bonding was meaningful. The Beacon Hill Civic Association and the neighborhood have always been there for us.”

Jordan Whitney, the 10-year-old daughter of Rob Whitney, president of the Civic Association’s board of directors, was among the children who made cards for Beacon House residents.

“It is important that our senior neighbors feel safe and loved – and not to get sad,” Jordan said.

            Along with the cards, the Civic Association also delivered around 40 protective face-masks to Beacon House residents that were made by volunteers through the efforts of board member Renee Walsh, Tully said.

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