Celebrating Boston with John Winthrop Sears

July 19, 2011
By

John Winthrop Sears name exudes Boston. It exudes the history of Boston. It is a name synonymous with the Founding Fathers of this city and state and with the first families of this nation from the time of our founding.

Meeting with Mr. Sears is always to be informed about the great history he comes from and which he is inclined to call his own and to share with others as well.

Last month, Mr. Sears hosted “An Evening with John Sears” as part of the 10th celebration of the Beacon Hill Village.

His performance, as usual, was signature John Sears – a combination of erudition, history, understanding of the human predicament and of what it took to make what Boston has come to be today.

He should know.

He is, like many of his ancestors before him, a Harvard man through and through with an extraordinary career spent in public service. He is truly a man of the people and has always tried to maintain that persona and voice.

He is a former two-term member of the Massachusetts House of Representatives, former candidate for mayor of Boston and governor, sheriff of Suffolk County, former chairman of the Metropolitan District Commission now the Department of Conservation and Recreation, former member of the Boston City Council – and a formidable one at that – an on and on and on.

Mr. Sears has lived a charmed life and when he takes to sharing what he knows about the history of this place as he did at the BHV, it is an event not to miss.

At the BHV recently he recounted the rich and enduring history of the Sears Mansion.

More importantly, he gave rich insight and detail on much of Boston’s magnificent history, including the role of the Sears Family and the effect it had on development here both intellectual and businesswise over the generations.

Mr. Sears is one of those very rare Bostonians who knows of what he speaks when it comes to the evolving history of Beacon Hill and Back Bay.

He has achieved many things during a long life spent in Boston.

However, he has found his real place in life as one of the significant voices about Boston’s history.

We thank him for his visit to the BHV – and above all- for all that he knows about Boston and which he feels compelled to share.

Thank you, Mr. Sears.

  • Herbert Voigt

    John Winthrop Sears
    1930- 2014 – May he rest in Peace

    5 November 2014

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