Beacon Hill Civic Association Community Corner

February 9, 2018
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Supporting efforts to reduce nips littering neighborhood streets

Among other initiatives to improve the cleanliness and safety of Cambridge Street, the BHCA Cambridge Street Committee has been addressing the littering of nips sold at the street’s liquor stores. Toward that end, members encourage residents to support House Bill 3528 that subjects alcoholic beverages sold in ‘miniatures’ to the 1983 Massachusetts Bottle Bill.

The Bottle Bill places a five cent deposit on many beverage containers sold in Massachusetts. It applies to carbonated soft drinks, beer, malt beverages and sparkling waters. Consumers may return clean, empty deposit bottles and cans to a retailer that sells them or to a redemption center. Under the Bottle Bill, retailers must redeem containers at full deposit value. Redemption centers may deduct processing fees from refunds.

Miniatures, often called nips, are any sealable bottle, can, jar or carton primarily composed of glass, metal, plastic or any combination of those materials that have a capacity of not more than 100 milliliters and is produced for the purpose of containing an alcoholic beverage.

The House bill was referred to the Joint Committee on Telecommunications, Utilities and Energy last year, and a very positive hearing was held at the State House last June, according to Rachel Thurlow who chairs the Cambridge Street Committee.  “The bill’s fate will be decided on Wednesday, February 7, when it will be either killed or reported out of committee and continued on for vote,” she said.

State Rep. Jay Livingston was one of nearly 30 legislators who petitioned for the Bill. Those interested in supporting the bill should contact the Chairs of the Joint Committee to voice their support. For the Chairs’ contact information, call the BHCA at 617-227-1922.

 

Mothers Out Front turns 5

The BHCA congratulates Mothers Out Front (MOF) which is celebrating its 5th anniversary this year.

The MOF movement is led by local teams of dedicated volunteers, who determine their community’s needs and choose their own goals. Committed volunteers in Beacon Hill were among the first to join the grassroots organization whose mission is to ensure a livable climate for all children.

It is fast becoming a diverse national movement, with more than 800 active volunteers working in Alabama, California, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New York, Ohio, Virginia and Washington. The teams partner with other local environmental organizations concerned about the effects of climate change.

The Boston MOF team, which includes representatives from the BHCA Green Committee, has largely focused its efforts on getting methane gas leaks fixed, curbing the harm they do to trees, public health, the environment and consumer’s pocketbooks.

 

Get involved in 2018

Beacon Hill Civic Association committees comprise volunteers working together from all over the neighborhood to assure a good quality of life here. All neighbors are welcome to join. Visit the Beacon Hill Civic Association website bhcivic.org and/or call the office (617-227-1922) for more information on how to get involved.

 

Meetings

Tuesday, February 6: Streets & Sidewalks Committee Meeting. 6:30 p.m., 74 Joy Street

 

Wednesday, February 7: Cambridge Street Committee Meeting.

6 p.m., 74 Joy Street

 

Wednesday, February 7: Zoning & Licensing Committee Meeting.

7 p.m., 74 Joy Street

 

Thursday, February 8: Traffic & Parking Committee Meeting. 6 p.m., 127 Mt. Vernon Street (Fire House)

 

Upcoming Special Events

Tuesday, February 20: Historic Preservation Roundtable. Museum of African-American History, 46 Joy Street.

 

Visit the Beacon Hill Civic Association website bhcivic.org and/or call the office (617-227-1922) for more information on how to get involved.

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