Reception on Exhibit Planned at Nichols House

June 1, 2018
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On Thursday, June 7, from 5:30-7:30 p.m., the Nichols House Museum presents an opening reception for the exhibition, Their Objects, Their Stories: The Nichols Women as Collectors, 1870-1960, on view through October 13, 2018. The reception is free and open to the public but advanced registration is required.

Register at http://nicholshousemuseum.org/programs_events.php or call (617) 227-6993.

Their Objects, Their Stories celebrates Elizabeth and Rose Nichols for their autonomy and individualism in what they chose to collect, and how their respective collecting practices were in step with the aspirations of the Gilded Age and the women’s rights movement of the early 20th-century. From a sixteenth century Flemish tapestry to twentieth century bronzeworks by sculptor Paul Manship, this exhibition features fifteen works in the permanent collection, and spans nearly 400 years of art across three continents. Letters, account books, and other ephemera are also on view to shed light on this mother-daughter relationship and their individual careers as Boston’s lesser known tastemakers.

Exhibition programming will include after-hours tours and a lecture by Erica Hirshler, Senior Curator of American Paintings at the MFA, among other events. For a full listing of programs, please visit http://nicholshousemuseum.org/programs_events.php

The Nichols House Museum is located at 55 Mount Vernon Street, Boston, MA 02108 and is open Tuesday through Saturday, 11:00 AM to 5PM with tours on the hour, the last tour of the day is at 4PM. Call 617-227-6993 or visit www.nicholshousemuseum.org for further information.

The Nichols House Museum preserves and interprets the 1804 Federal townhouse that was home to landscape gardener, suffragist and pacifist Rose Standish Nichols and her family. Their home and its original art and furnishings provide a glimpse into life on historic Beacon Hill from the mid-19th to mid-20th century. The museum educates and inspires the public through innovative programs, and it continues the conversation on the social concerns the Nichols family embraced that are still relevant today.

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